Kentucky Farm Bureau Ham Breakfast Review

BB ham

Every year, Kentucky Farm Bureau hosts a traditional Kentucky ham breakfast. The event takes place roughly one week after the Kentucky State Fair begins. “The Ham Breakfast celebrates agriculture and brings together urban and rural Kentuckians from every part of the state.” (KFB) This year, the tradition celebrated its 53rd anniversary, and had 1,600 attendees. The breakfast tradition began back in 1964, and to date has raised nearly $9.3 million dollars for organizations and charities across Kentucky.

Broadbent’s B & B Foods has won the Grand Champion Ham Blue Ribbon 17 times including our latest win this year. The wins have not all been consecutive but the bidding prices for these hams continue to raise hundreds of thousands of dollars for Kentucky charities. This year’s buyer was Central Bank, with a winning bid of $600,000 which they decided to split among 6 organizations and charities. Some may not realize but, it is actually the auction winner who decides which organizations the money bid is donated too.

Throughout our purple ribbon success (in this contest the blue ribbons are participation ribbons), we have set multiple records for the dollar amounts of the winning bids. Back in 2005, just a decade ago our ham broke a new record by bringing in $500,000 from First Southern Bank. Then that record was smashed by the $1,600,000 paid for the 2010 Grand Champion Ham. The record didn’t last long before in 2014, the Grand Champion Ham fetched a whopping $2 million dollars when purchased by Hermitage Farm, LLC and Republic Bank. That record has yet to be broken. Each year it is anyone’s guess as to what dollar amounts the bids will jump to during the Ham Breakfast auction, but we look forward to it each year.

Just for fun, let’s put a little perspective on this year’s winning bid. At $600,000 for a 17.38-pound ham, it comes out to right at $34,522 per pound. Online at broadbenthams.com you can purchase a similar ham cured in the same fashion and around the same size for merely $72.00. That means to get that same dollar amount we would need to sell 8,334 hams, and that’s not considering our initial cost for the hams. Sometimes it is overwhelming to think of how much money our ham’s fetch, but then again it is all for charity and that kind of money can bring some pretty amazing changes for those Kentuckians touched by this blessing.

Kentucky State Fair 2016

Beth & Ronny Drennan with Judge Tony Snow & The Grand Champion Ham

The Kentucky State Fair has been around since 1816, but Broadbent came onto the scene a bit later. It has been a tradition to enter a ham in the commercial Grand Champion Ham Competition for several years. Broadbent’s first entered in 1967 and also claimed their 1st Grand Champ Award. This year was our 17th win. It was the 10th win for Ronny and Beth since owning Broadbent B & B Foods. We feel it is a tremendous honor to be named Grand Champion. The Kentucky State Fair Country Ham Competition is second to none. Judge Tony Snow from Goodnight Brothers in North Carolina said “this competition was intense; judging was much harder than I had anticipated it would be”.

August 25th our winning ham will go up for sale at the Kentucky Farm Bureau Country Ham Breakfast. The winner of the ham will choose a charity to receive the money from the winning bid. Contrary to what some may think, we do not actually receive any profits from a winning ham. Instead we receive the accolade, bragging rights, and knowledge that we helped gain a large contribution to a charity that is usually based here in Kentucky.

This year we entered all five country ham classes. Four of the five hams we entered went on to place 1st in their class. The winner of classes 1-4 go on to compete for the Grand Champion and we had three hams in this phase of the competition with our Class 2 ham coming out victorious. Our Grand Champion Ham was put into cure before Jan. 1st, 2016 and weighed approximately 17 lbs. The fifth class is the cut class and we placed 1st in this class. The last class is the Group of Five. Scores for all 5 hams entered by a producer are totaled and the producer with the highest score will place 1st in this class. We continue to enter every year to maintain high level of quality as well as being a part of the Kentucky proud community.

Kentucky State Fair competitions aren’t just for companies or adults. Every year we work with children from local 4-H chapters and assist them with curing their own hams for the fair. This year we worked with 60 children who started curing 2 hams months in advance. Then, roughly a week before the fair they choose the best of their 2 hams then cleaned and shined the hams to be sent in to competition. There were several winners. We are fortunate to be able to give back to the local community in such a fun and rewarding manner.

Watch next week for more information on the Kentucky Farm Bureau Country Ham Charity Auction.

Broadbent Ham’s: The Entrepreneurial Journey of Beth & Ronny Drennan

Broadbent Ham’s- The Entrepreneurial Journey of Beth & Ronny Drennan


About 38 years ago, Beth and Ronny Drennan married and began an entrepreneurial journey with twists and turns guided by faith. Ronny had come from a farming background was no stranger to hard work and the entrepreneurial spirit. Ronny decided that farming was not his own personal career path to follow and decided to seek employment in other industries.

Ronny came across the opportunity to purchase a fuel service center, together they took the risk. Over a few years they grew it to include a bulk fuel supply, which supplied fuel for local farmers. The status quo of the town changed as less and less individuals farmed with encouragement from local government. The lack of farming dried business up for the bulk station, and soon the Drennan’s encountered a potential buyer and chose to sell the bulk supply half of the business. Soon the service station was sold as well. They found themselves looking to the next endeavor. Beth, who had worked alongside Ronnie at the stations found herself in need of amusement during the down time of a slow business. She turned to crafts, particularly Tole Painting (decorative painting on tin and wooden utensils). Ronnie assisted her by cutting shapes and building pine furniture, and they expanded their hobby to their next business.

Their primary distributor’s husband was a broker who sold businesses. He talked with Ronny during a routine drop off of goods and offered him the opportunity to perhaps purchase Broadbent Ham’s a mail order company. The Drennan’s continued to weigh the decision of purchasing Broadbent Ham’s throughout that year. Knowing it would be their largest undertaking yet, they again decided to have faith and dove in.

In 1999, the sale was final and the Drennan’s now owned the small company which employed 1 FT and 1 PT worker along with 12 seasonal workers. Today, they employee 20 individuals and operate a Deli & Gourmet Market that fronts their 20,000 sq ft production facility. They continue the traditional recipes and enter annually in the Kentucky State Fair. Their cured Kentucky Country hams continue to bring home blue ribbons and uphold family traditions.
We hope that you will continue to be part of a rich Kentucky tradition that dates back to 1909.

We welcome anyone to stop by our facility. We are happy to give tours and answer any questions. We are so grateful to be part of the rich heritage of Kentucky and hope to continue growing our business in the coming years.

5 Tips for Cooking with Kids

5 Tips for Cooking with Kids imagePlan Ahead

Children are not known for their patience so be sure to have every tool and ingredient at the ready. Create a clear space with all necessary equipment ready to use that the child(ren) can easily reach. Have the child wear the right attire, old clothes/play clothes or an apron.

Extras for Tasting/Touching

Children love to explore and it is a big part of their learning experience so include a few extras that they can touch and eat in the moment. This is of course ingredients that they can eat uncooked. But extra is usually good because things can be dropped on the floor, etc.

Practice Good Hygiene

This is a great time to teach about germs and basic hygiene. Remember to wash hands in the beginning, after handling each type of raw food, and when completed. Be sure to differentiate using different or cleaned utensils between raw and cooked foods.

Choose Recipes/Tasks at their level

Every child is unique in their interests and skill levels at different ages. Many children’s recipes and recipe books will have age guidelines but follow your own instincts as you know your child best. Choose a few tasks for them specifically, such as washing vegetables, mixing with a spoon, measuring, etc. based on their level. As the parent you can fill in the between or prep certain things before they enter. Children love to feel like they are helpful and have a purpose/responsibility and cooking allows them that in a controlled environment.

Have Fun

Cooking is often a fun activity but only if you allow it to be. As a parent have patience and don’t expect perfection. Relax and help guide them as they try to learn new skills if you are nervous or allow them to do very little they will lose out on making a good connection with cooking.

In my own family we usually had special nights that children cook, these were nights when time was not an issue. But I remember when I graduated from using a butter knife to cut some basic things, to a real slicing knife. It brought a sense of accomplishment and pride. Every child no matter the attitude, age (physical or mental) look for the same things in life to feel a part of some community. Family is our first community, so don’t think of cooking as chore but as a chance for your child to contribute.

Here are 2 recipes we love to create with kids in the kitchen.

Hot Ham Sandwiches Serves 4

4 Favorite rolls (croissants, homemade, etc.)
4 Thick Ham Slices (pre-cooked ham)
4 Cheese Slices (Cheddar, Swiss, Provolone or family favorite)
Onion Powder, to taste
Garlic Powder, to taste
Butter, to spread

Set out your rolls, ham, and cheese. Depending on the level you can use pre-sliced cheese or let them slice it with a knife or cheese slicer. Same with the ham, you can slice it to preferred size or let them cut it to the size they desire. You could also use cookie cutters to make fun shapes both from the ham and cheese, plus it skips using actual knives.

Turn over roll tops and add a simple coat of butter, then sprinkle with light garlic and onion powders. Stack sandwiches together and layer on a greased cookie sheet.

Bake in oven at 350 for about 15 minutes or until heated completely throughout.

*Feel free to add any other condiments your family love.

Eggs in a Hole with Bacon Serves 1

1 Slice Bread, any variety
1 Egg
Salt & Pepper to Taste
2 Slices Bacon
Grease skillet, and turn to low heat.

Cut a 1 ½ to 2 inch hole from the center, a small cookie cutter can be used also. Lay the bread into the skillet, and lightly toasted about 2 minutes. Then flip and crack egg directly into the created hole. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Continue to cook until the egg is cooked to firm, flip again and cook about 1 minutes more.

On a microwave safe plate, layer 3-4 paper towels. Place 2 slices of bacon across the plate and place in microwave for minutes. Cook longer 1 minute at a time until to desired crispiness level.
Serve immediately.

This is a great recipe for children who are just being introduced to using an actual stove top because the heat element remains on low, and the cooking time is short. If you are cooking for lots of people, you could let the children line the bacon on a cookie sheet and bake in oven rather than microwave to save time.

At Broadbent, we believe that meal time is family time and being a part of the preparation can let children feel like a more contributing member of their family. We encourage you to try a recipe in the kitchen with your children or grandchildren and introduce them to cooking. It is not only fun; it is a basic skill that every individual should know how to do in a basic sense.

3 International Pork Recipes to Inspire your Kitchen

international inspiration

Pork is a meat prevalent in many dishes around the world. The majority of countries incorporate Pork into their culture and cooking in a variety of ways. There are a few countries whose primary religion do not partake in the eating of pork and often other meats where the consumption is the lowest. The highest rate of pork consumption actually takes place in China.
To expand on your pork recipe repertoire, we wanted to share these 3 recipes that are delightful and don’t take a culinary degree to bring the taste to your table.

China

In China, a large movement begin in late 1970’s after the government liberalized agriculture. Now China’s pork consumption accounts for nearly half of the entire world. Pigs in general are avidly found throughout the Chinese culture including Zodiac signs, the character for family, and as part of many celebrations.
From trotter to tail, the Chinese consume the entire hog. Each part of the pig is used in various recipes to be sure that no part is wasted. Pigs are also often kept in Chinese homes because they create manure that fertilizes the family gardens. Some of the most well-known pork recipes are available here in the U.S. as well including Sweet & Sour Pork, Wontons, Dumplings, Chow Mein, and Spring Rolls. Below we have included my favorite recipe for Sweet & Sour Pork.
SWEET AND SOUR PORK (rasamalaysia.com)
INGREDIENTS:
1/2 lb. pork tenderloin (cut into bite size pieces)
1/2 green bell pepper (about 2 oz. and cut into pieces)
1/2 red bell pepper (about 2 oz. and cut into pieces)
2 stalks scallions (only the white part, cut into 2 inch length)
1 piece fresh/canned pineapple ring (cut into small pieces)
1 clove garlic (finely chopped)
Oil for frying
MARINATE:
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon corn starch
1/2 teaspoon rice wine
FRYING BATTER:
1/2 cup water
2 oz. all-purpose flour
1 oz. corn starch
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 egg
1 teaspoon cooking oil
1 small pinch of salt
SWEET AND SOUR SAUCE:
1 1/2 tablespoons tomato ketchup
1 teaspoon plum sauce
1/8 teaspoon Chinese rice vinegar (transparent in color)
1/2 teaspoon Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce
1 teaspoon oyster sauce
1 teaspoon corn starch
1 teaspoon sugar
2 tablespoons water
INSTRUCTIONS:
Cut the pork tenderloin into pieces and marinate with the ingredients for 15-20 minutes.
Mix the sweet and sour sauce ingredients well and set aside.
Strain the dry ingredients of the frying batter and then add in the egg, water, and cooking oil to form a thick batter.
When the pork is well-marinated, transfer the pork pieces into the batter and make sure they are well coated. In a deep skillet, add in the cooking oil enough for deep-frying. Once the oil is hot, deep fry the pork pieces until they turn golden brown. Dish out and drain on paper towels.
Heat up a wok and add in some cooking oil. Add in the chopped garlic and stir fry until light brown, then follow by the bell peppers and pineapple pieces. Stir fry until you smell the peppery aroma from the peppers and then add in the sweet and sour sauce. As soon as the sauce thickens, transfer the pork into the wok and stir well with the sauce. Add in the chopped scallions, do a few quick stirs, dish out and serve hot with steamed white rice.

United Kingdom

In the United Kingdom pork is a popular meat used in a large variety of dishes. Similar to America they often roast, fry, and barbecue their pork. Unlike most Americans they also utilize the pork belly frequently, the head for recipes such as Braised Pig’s Head and Pig’s Head Terrine. This usage of each part of the pig is often found in fine dining establishments, as well as in the rural homes that often come to mind. One common style of pork not often utilized in American cooking is minced meat. This easy recipe from Chef Jamie Oliver’s collection includes traditional minced pork.
Pork & Apple Sausage Rolls (Jamie Oliver Recipe)
INGREDIENTS
  • 1 leek
  • 1 Royal Gala apple
  • 4 sprigs of fresh thyme
  • 500 g minced pork
  • ½ teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 500 g puff pastry
  • 1 large free-range eggs
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Preheat the oven to 200ºC/gas 6.
  2. Wash, trim and dice the leek, core and dice the apple, then pick the thyme leaves.
  3. Combine the pork, leek, apple, thyme leaves and mustard seeds in a bowl. Season and set aside.
  4. Roll out the pastry to 1cm thick and 30 x 34cm. Halve lengthways and place a strip of mince down the center of each.
  5. Brush the edges with beaten egg, roll up and seal. Brush with more egg, then cut each strip into 3 rolls.
  6. Score the tops and bake for 20 minutes, or until golden and cooked through.

Australia

In Australia, the country is leading the way in pig care. The industry began to phase out sow stall back in 2010 and continues to strive towards breeding contented and healthy pigs. Farmers often recognize the pig as a vital part of their lifestyle. Pig producers use manure and effluent on their farms as fertilizer to improve their pasture and crops, some go a step further and capture the methane gases which are then converted to fuel. Australia’s pig herd health is one of the best in the world, their farms are free of many of the diseases that plague others around the world.
Many recipes traditional to Australia are lighter than some of the heavy American familiar dishes but are quite similar overall. They also utilize many similar styles to the United Kingdom, stemming from their immigration roots just as America employs its cooking styles from a wide variety on influencing countries.
Australian Ham Burger (pork.com/au)
INGREDIENTS
4 Briosche buns
4 Thick Sliced of Australian Leg Ham
4 Slices medium hard cheese (Jarlsberg is traditional)
4 Large Dill pickles, sandwich sliced
½ C Mayonnaise
2 T. Mustard Seed
2 tsp. Olive Oil
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Heat a griddle pan over medium heat and grill the brioche rolls until golden and warmed through. Remove and set aside.
  2. Use the oil to grill the sliced ham on the griddle for 2 minutes on each side. Turn off the heat and stack the ham into 4 portions and top with Swiss cheese.
  3. Spread the base of each roll with seeded mustard and the top of each roll with a good dollop of mayonnaise.
  4. Transfer the grilled ham and cheese onto the base of each roll, top the cheese with a sliced dill pickle.
  5. Replace the top of the bun and serve immediately
I especially love the Australian Ham Burger, it is delicious and a lighter alternative for the traditional beef burger that is a summer staple. Each culture places different values and usefulness on various animals. Pigs are very popular and valued in so many cultures, even those where it may not be a staple on the dinner table but is within the community. I encourage you to click the links and take a look around at these and other recipes to inspire your taste buds.
When it comes to cooking, it’s a great area to take risks and go outside your comfort zone. Do you have any favorite recipes for pork? We are fans of family traditions here at Broadbent, please share your family favorites.

3 International Pork Inspiration

Pork is a meat prevalent in many dishes around the world. The majority of countries incorporate Pork into their culture and cooking in a variety of ways. There are a few countries whose primary religion do not partake in the eating of pork and often other meats where the consumption is the lowest. The highest rate of pork consumption actually takes place in China.

To expand on your pork recipe repertoire, we wanted to share these 3 recipes that are delightful and don’t take a culinary degree to bring the taste to your table.

China

In China, a large movement begin in late 1970’s after the government liberalized agriculture. Now China’s pork consumption accounts for nearly half of the entire world. Pigs in general are avidly found throughout the Chinese culture including Zodiac signs, the character for family, and as part of many celebrations.
From trotter to tail, the Chinese consume the entire hog. Each part of the pig is used in various recipes to be sure that no part is wasted. Pigs are also often kept in Chinese homes because they create manure that fertilizes the family gardens. Some of the most well-known pork recipes are available here in the U.S. as well including Sweet & Sour Pork, Wontons, Dumplings, Chow Mein, and Spring Rolls. Below we have included my favorite recipe for Sweet & Sour Pork.

SWEET AND SOUR PORK (rasamalaysia.com)

INGREDIENTS:
1/2 lb. pork tenderloin (cut into bite size pieces)
1/2 green bell pepper (about 2 oz. and cut into pieces)
1/2 red bell pepper (about 2 oz. and cut into pieces)
2 stalks scallions (only the white part, cut into 2 inch length)
1 piece fresh/canned pineapple ring (cut into small pieces)
1 clove garlic (finely chopped)
Oil for frying

MARINATE:
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon corn starch
1/2 teaspoon rice wine

FRYING BATTER:
1/2 cup water
2 oz. all-purpose flour
1 oz. corn starch
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 egg
1 teaspoon cooking oil
1 small pinch of salt

SWEET AND SOUR SAUCE:
1 1/2 tablespoons tomato ketchup
1 teaspoon plum sauce
1/8 teaspoon Chinese rice vinegar (transparent in color)
1/2 teaspoon Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce
1 teaspoon oyster sauce
1 teaspoon corn starch
1 teaspoon sugar
2 tablespoons water

INSTRUCTIONS:
Cut the pork tenderloin into pieces and marinate with the ingredients for 15-20 minutes.
Mix the sweet and sour sauce ingredients well and set aside.
Strain the dry ingredients of the frying batter and then add in the egg, water, and cooking oil to form a thick batter.
When the pork is well-marinated, transfer the pork pieces into the batter and make sure they are well coated. In a deep skillet, add in the cooking oil enough for deep-frying. Once the oil is hot, deep fry the pork pieces until they turn golden brown. Dish out and drain on paper towels.
Heat up a wok and add in some cooking oil. Add in the chopped garlic and stir fry until light brown, then follow by the bell peppers and pineapple pieces. Stir fry until you smell the peppery aroma from the peppers and then add in the sweet and sour sauce. As soon as the sauce thickens, transfer the pork into the wok and stir well with the sauce. Add in the chopped scallions, do a few quick stirs, dish out and serve hot with steamed white rice.

United Kingdom

In the United Kingdom pork is a popular meat used in a large variety of dishes. Similar to America they often roast, fry, and barbecue their pork. Unlike most Americans they also utilize the pork belly frequently, the head for recipes such as Braised Pig’s Head and Pig’s Head Terrine. This usage of each part of the pig is often found in fine dining establishments, as well as in the rural homes that often come to mind. One common style of pork not often utilized in American cooking is minced meat. This easy recipe from Chef Jamie Oliver’s collection includes traditional minced pork.

Pork & Apple Sausage Rolls (Jamie Oliver Recipe)

INGREDIENTS
  • 1 leek
  • 1 Royal Gala apple
  • 4 sprigs of fresh thyme
  • 500 g minced pork
  • ½ teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 500 g puff pastry
  • 1 large free-range eggs
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Preheat the oven to 200ºC/gas 6.
  2. Wash, trim and dice the leek, core and dice the apple, then pick the thyme leaves.
  3. Combine the pork, leek, apple, thyme leaves and mustard seeds in a bowl. Season and set aside.
  4. Roll out the pastry to 1cm thick and 30 x 34cm. Halve lengthways and place a strip of mince down the center of each.
  5. Brush the edges with beaten egg, roll up and seal. Brush with more egg, then cut each strip into 3 rolls.
  6. Score the tops and bake for 20 minutes, or until golden and cooked through.

Australia

In Australia, the country is leading the way in pig care. The industry began to phase out sow stall back in 2010 and continues to strive towards breeding contented and healthy pigs. Farmers often recognize the pig as a vital part of their lifestyle. Pig producers use manure and effluent on their farms as fertilizer to improve their pasture and crops, some go a step further and capture the methane gases which are then converted to fuel. Australia’s pig herd health is one of the best in the world, their farms are free of many of the diseases that plague others around the world.

Many recipes traditional to Australia are lighter than some of the heavy American familiar dishes but are quite similar overall. They also utilize many similar styles to the United Kingdom, stemming from their immigration roots just as America employs its cooking styles from a wide variety on influencing countries.

Australian Ham Burger (pork.com/au)

INGREDIENTS
4 Briosche buns
4 Thick Sliced of Australian Leg Ham
4 Slices medium hard cheese (Jarlsberg is traditional)
4 Large Dill pickles, sandwich sliced
½ C Mayonnaise
2 T. Mustard Seed
2 tsp. Olive Oil

INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Heat a griddle pan over medium heat and grill the brioche rolls until golden and warmed through. Remove and set aside.
  2. Use the oil to grill the sliced ham on the griddle for 2 minutes on each side. Turn off the heat and stack the ham into 4 portions and top with Swiss cheese.
  3. Spread the base of each roll with seeded mustard and the top of each roll with a good dollop of mayonnaise.
  4. Transfer the grilled ham and cheese onto the base of each roll, top the cheese with a sliced dill pickle.
  5. Replace the top of the bun and serve immediately
I especially love the Australian Ham Burger, it is delicious and a lighter alternative for the traditional beef burger that is a summer staple. Each culture places different values and usefulness on various animals. Pigs are very popular and valued in so many cultures, even those where it may not be a staple on the dinner table but is within the community. I encourage you to click the links and take a look around at these and other recipes to inspire your taste buds.

When it comes to cooking, it’s a great area to take risks and go outside your comfort zone. Do you have any favorite recipes for pork? We are fans of family traditions here at Broadbent, please share your family favorites.

5 Bacon Desserts You can DIY

5 Bacon Dessert You Can DIY

When it comes to bacon it is a natural fit for breakfast and pairs wonderfully with so many dishes at lunch and dinner. Now let’s talk dessert. Bacon makes almost everything better (like 99% of things). We are getting serious about the sweet and salty side of dessert with these 5 bacon centered dessert recipes.

#1 Chocolate Covered Pretzels with Bacon Sprinkles
Depending on the exact number of pretzels you can cook a few stripes of bacon in the microwave for a small batch or for a large I suggest cooking a full package in the oven.
Ingredients:
1 bag Pretzel Rods
12 oz. semi- sweet chocolate (chips, chunk, etc) Chocolate
1 lb. your favorite flavor of Broadbent’s bacon
Instructions:
Once the bacon is cooked crumble it and set in a shallow dish next to the chocolate. Melt your chocolate in double boiler or microwave whichever you prefer. Dip pretzel rods into chocolate roughly ¾ of the way up, then roll along the shallow dish filled with bacon crumbles. (if you want a light coating try sprinkling it on instead). Place on a lined cookie sheet with parchment paper and place in refrigerator for 15-20 minutes to allow it to fully harden. Then display in a large clear vase or jar and serve with chocolate side down.

#2 Chocolate Covered Bacon Bites
This is the recipe where Broadbent’s thick cut bacon really shines. It is hearty enough to cook and support the additional chocolate coating.
Ingredients
1 pkg Broadbent’s Thick Cut Maple or Hickory Bacon
1 C. Semi-sweet chocolate (chips, chunk, etc.)
Optional Coatings: chopped nuts, sea salt, brown sugar, cayenne pepper, coconut, sprinkles, white chocolate drizzle

(more…)

10 Staples of a Southern Pantry

10 Staples of a Southern Pantry

#1 Pasta. This is true basically across the country because every region uses pasta in some way it seems. Try a variety of flavors and styles to find your family favorites. Dry pasta lasts for a very long time in the pantry so don’t be afraid to buy more than a couple to have on hand.

#2 Flour. This is again most likely across the country because of how often flour is needed in recipes whether it is bread, cake or a thickening for gravy. What would biscuits and gravy be without the flour……. Well runny. The exact type will be personal preference and they offer so many more than twenty years ago it seems. Most can be used interchangeably so you don’t have to keep a lot of variety in the pantry.

#3 Sugar. How would we be able to stay in sweet tea without our sugar. There are a lot of sugar substitutes and if you want them who are we to judge, but I would recommend standard white sugar to have in the cupboard. Sugar can be called for in all types of recipes you may not think of in small amounts but if you don’t have it, you don’t have it. I would recommend storing it in a container rather than the bag it comes in though to help it from getting any moisture or critters especially if you don’t go through it quickly.

#4 Rice. Long-grain rice is the most common but there are many varieties to choose from. Rice can be made on the side or served beneath many traditionally southern dishes to help fill up a crowd.

#5 Oils & Vinegars. Of course on and always have canola or vegetable oil along with a great Olive Oil. Always recommend having the three basic vinegars including red wine, cider and balsamic. These fundamentals are the corner stone of many marinades and salad dressings.

#6 Stock. Basics such as chicken or beef stock are a must have in the pantry at all times. A large majority of recipes will call for the appropriate stock as a recipes base but any time you are throwing something together stock is a go to ingredient. This is especially true in the fall and winter when soups can be tossed in the crockpot for a quick and easy home cooked meal.

#7 Bacon. Bacon is extremely versatile. There are different varieties so be sure to have one that goes with everything on hand such as a hickory. Here at Broadbent we offer Hickory Smoked Bacon, Peppered Bacon, Applewood Smoked and Maplewood Smoked. We highly suggest cutting it into smaller pieces or ordering our bacon seasoning pieces’ package. This will allow you to utilize bacon in cooking without unfreezing a whole package and wondering what to do with the rest (though I mean I just eat it…can you really worry about having extra bacon??)

#8 Tomatoes. Canned tomatoes are another wonderfully delicious base ingredient. Now you may not be thinking store brand canned tomatoes are what I want to eat. In the south, plenty of us have beautiful gardens and a surplus crop of tomatoes so canning is popular. This allows you to have your own garden fresh tomatoes all year long. Tomatoes are base in a lot of creole dishes which are very popular here.

#9 Potatoes. Potatoes are stored in cool dry places for longevity but don’t forget about them so store them near the front of your pantry. Potatoes are also versatile and great for large families or a get together. Whether you want to fry, bake, boil or sauté them I personally recommend the red or yellow varieties as they are less starchy than the traditional Idaho potato but choose what your family prefers.

#10 Onions. Onions can be added to just about any dish to give it a punch of flavor. They should be stored near your potatoes in a cool dry place for a longer life. They are popular in creole dishes but are great additions to pasta dishes, soups, or grilled with any meat varieties. I even utilize them at breakfast from omelets to breakfast burritos.

A well-known part of being a Southerner is the great tradition of being a gracious host/hostess. Having these staples will help you be prepared whenever extra company is added at the last moment. You can make extra beverages, and stretch a meal further utilize these ingredients. They can also help you have the ability to create a few dishes at the last moment. Right now, Fall and Winter are on their way so be sure to stock up on these items. That way when the weather gets dicey there is less need to travel to the store for these basic items.

Food Trucks Cater to the Modern Lifestyle

 

Since its inception in 2008, the modern food truck revolution has exploded. When it began traditional hot dogs and tacos ruled the roads. Now food trucks are as gourmet as some of the best restaurants in the hottest cities. The main difference is that these trucks can come to you whether a work site, row of high rise office buildings, downtown and even wedding venues. While those unfamiliar may believe these are another form of standard greasy fast food, that is simply not the case.

Many of these trucks are serving a variety of trendy and delicious gourmet style foods. In 2014, Chef Jason Broz saw the potential in the ability to be self-employed along with his wife and began their own business in the contemporary food truck industry. Broadbent specifically does business with Chef Jason Broz the owner/operator of Bac’n Me Crazy. For his truck, he orders hundreds of pounds of our varieties of bacon per week.

Bac’n Me Crazy as its name implies is centered around bacon. The menu offers it in several forms including a Triple Bacon Burger, Chicken Bacon Cutlet, BMC Club, BLT, Ultimate Grilled Cheese, Bacon Cordon Bleu, and a summer salad with bacon. In case that’s not enough bacon, you can get a dessert such as Candy Bacon, Bacon Brownie or Chocolate Bacon.  As the owner of a themed food truck, Jason is always on the lookout to utilize bacon in new ways that appeal to the food truck crowds.Food Trucks Cater to the Modern Lifestyle

One of the most unique characteristics of the food truck style is that it often breeds hybrids. Due to wanting to provide something easy to eat at a picnic table or on the go traditional recipes get a twist. One of the most popular on the west coast is a combination of Korean BBQ and Mexican Tacos.

When it comes to marketing, the plan is as modern as the food truck experience itself. Social Media is the go to strategy, because they offer instant delivery and can be updated quickly and easily. Individuals can follow their favorite trucks to see when and where they will be on any given day.

As the movement worked its way across the nation, this trendy convergences of food styles can be found from east to west. Bac’n Me Crazy is located in Charlestown, South Carolina they can be tracked via their social media sites. We would strongly recommend giving them a try if it’s your home town or just passing through.

If your unable to catch Bac’n Me Crazy, we highly encourage using Broadbent’s bacon and experimenting at home to make your own creations. Whether it’s a new twist on your traditional BLT or adding bacon to a dish you never thought to before, creativity in the kitchen is always fun.

Want to check out Bac’n Me Crazy see their Facebook or Twitter. https://www.facebook.com/bacnmecrazyfoodtruck/ or https://twitter.com/BacnMeCrazy

10 Quick Tips for Grilling Pork

10 Tips for Grilling Pork

Cooking Prep

#1 Spray the grill grate with cooking spray prior to lighting. If you don’t have spray brush a thin layer of oil across your cut before laying it on the grill. To prevent sticking you can run the spatula underneath the meat once before flipping.

#2 Trim excess fat off your pork cuts to reduce the chance of flare-ups as well and make clean up easier. Leave roughly ¼- inch of fat or less to allow the fat to additionally flavor the meat. Broadbent’s offers a variety of lean pork, offering just enough fat to flavor.

#3 When grabbing your grilling tools avoid using forks as they pierce the meat and allow for loss of juice. Instead use a tongs or metal spatula.

#4 Always use clean utensils and dishes when removing cooked meat from grill to avoid cross contamination.

During the Cooking Process

#5 Follow your individual recipes and use them to understand the cut of pork, each cooks differently requiring different heat and time on the grill.

#6 Don’t lift your grill lid unless checking for doneness or turning the food over.  Lifting the lid allows in extra oxygen which feeds the fire increases causing flare-ups.  This can cause burning and uneven cooking.

#7 Adjust your cooking time in accordance to the weather longer on cold days and less time during the extremely hot weather. With grilling a lot of variables need to be considered including the wind and the starting temperature of your meat.

#8 Stay hands off as much as possible. Do not press on your cut with utensils most cuts need flipped only once so flip it halfway through the estimated time and let it cook calmly the rest of the time.

#9 If you have a glaze of marinate apply it at various points throughout the cooking process such as before flipping.

#10 Pork can be one of the more difficult meats to know if it is fully cooked at a glance. Use a meat thermometer to take the guesswork out. Cook all pork to an internal temperature of 145˚F.