5 Tips for Tailgating

5 Tips for Tailgating Graphic

Football season is about to ramp up and we can’t wait for one of our favorite traditions. Tailgating is an experience built around the community of fans. Each team has their dedicated fans who deck themselves out in team colors to show support. If you’re planning to enjoy the game from the stadium, check out these 5 easy tips to make your tailgating experience the best one yet!

#1 Skip The Traffic

Be sure to plan to reach the parking lot early for a stress free experience. For a noon game, consider arriving around 8:30 am. This will let you skip the traffic and allow ample time for setting up your game day feast and festivities. Skip the post-game traffic by hanging out longer. Chilling with friends beats traffic any day.

#2 Plan ahead

Know your party and plan how much food, drinks and space will be needed. Avoid being crowded in a small spot, or not have enough chairs for everyone. Designate a meeting space, or tactic. If several are meeting there bring a unique flag or balloon arrangement something to let your group find you easily in a large crowd.

#3 Ice Cold Drinks

Most tailgaters want a cold beverage during the experience, whatever the flavor. Try placing your beverages in a salt-water ice bath to get them cold quickly and chilling all day. The added salt lowers the freezing point of water, allowing the cold water temperature to drop below 0 degrees Celsius. If you plan to tailgate in the winter or just a chilly morning, remember to pack the coffee and/or hot chocolate to make the experience more comfortable.

#4 Don’t forget the food.

You may be there for the game, but the food is what makes it tailgating. Bring enough food to satisfy everyone in your party. Grilling is the most popular means of cooking, prepare the food ahead as much as possible and be sure to marinade any meats the night before. We highly recommend ham steaks, they are filling, easy to grill and break the norm of burgers and dogs. We also suggest, adding a bit extra in case you make new friends or your party unexpectedly grows.

#5 Bring the Shade

In Summer, the sun can shine strong and parking lot areas are notoriously hot. Besides the shade, a canopy or pop-up tent will offer shelter if unexpected showers happen. Don’t forget the stakes to keep your top down if it gets windy. We know the die-hard fans will be there rain, snow, sun, or wind.

 

Don’t forget to have fun! Tailgating is meant to be an experience, so kick back with all the other fans and engage in the fun. No one will care if you do accidentally forget the napkins if the experience is positive overall. What is your favorite tip for tailgating? Share in the comments.

Broadbent’s 50th year Catalog Anniversary

It has been 50 yeafall catalogrs since the first Broadbent’s Food catalog was mailed to customers. That first catalog looked quite a bit different than our anniversary addition released this September. The first edition lacked color, prices and a few customer favorites. The black and white catalog featured slabs of bacon and large hams, those were the days when most slicing was done in the home. Since those days there has been a whole cultural shift, less time spent in the home and much, much more technology.

Our products and catalog have been shaped by these changes of the times, now customers often prefer convenient ordering and packaging. We are glad our business has been able to grow and to keep up with the changing lifestyles we have added 24/7 online ordering capabilities and pre-sliced ham. We have chosen not to change everything though. To keep with the tradition of being locally owned and operated though, we have continued to strive growing our facility in Kuttawa, Kentucky which employs several local residents.  At our facility we cure, process and package all our products then ship them out across the country.

thumb_IMG_0074_1024

Great workers packaging the individual ham slices at our facility in Kuttawa, Kentucky

Beyond our catalog and online sales, Broadbent Foods has increased considerably in the wholesale industry. Over the past few years, Ronnie & Beth have attended numerous food shows making connections with Chef’s and Restaurateurs throughout the culinary world. We proudly have our products featured in gourmet specialty stores and a variety of restaurants across the nation. There is a heavy focus in the northeast where deli style foods often fuel the busy masses. Having Chef’s use our products in such creative ways is also a unique part of owning Broadbent Foods.

broadbent at taste creation nashville

Ronny & Beth at Taste Creation in Nashville, TN

The years have been kind when we look back. We have been thankful to bring the Kentucky Proud tradition to the hearts and tables of families celebrating numerous special occasions. Easter, Thanksgiving and Christmas are special in this business, because we can just imagine all the hugs, kisses and conversations surrounding our products adorning lovely table tops.  We look forward to sharing in another 50 years of traditions.

Thank you for being a customer, and for letting Broadbent into your home to share in the tradition of your own family.

Combinations In The Kitchen

 

When it comes to food, sometimes an nontraditional pairing can bring out the best of separate flavors. Experimenting in the kitchen, whether it is trying something new and fanciful for date night or letting children blend their favorites can bring fun to the kitchen. We encourage any level of cook to look for ways to use common and familiar foods together to create something different.

Add Bacon

The five primary flavors are Sweet, Sour, Bitter, Salty and Savory. If you start by selecting two foods from different categories, you can begin to picture combinations. Think things through such as mixing milk with anything salty or bitter is unlikely to bring great results. Once you have a combination think of how you would put it together along with other complimentary flavors. Below are two fun and unique blends we found to offer a unique flavor experience.

Nontraditional Pairing Suggestions

The Tupelo Honey Café, a southern style restaurant in the Carolinas offers a great example of unusual pairings. They stack a sandwich high including: pimiento cheese, Havarti Cheese, caramelized onions, maple-flavored bacon, ham, fried green tomatoes and fresh basil on sourdough wheat bread. While this may seem like a combination that could even be overwhelming each elements brings its own exclusive flavor that is released during each savory bite. Try making your own version using your favorite elements such as Broadbent’s Maple Bacon.

Spicy, cheesy and savory come to mind with this recipe for Cheesy Bacon, Corn and Pepper Bread. This bread not only offers an unusual combination but the texture is then changed from a firmer bread to softer cake style. It can play to individuals who love a spicy kick but savory enough for those who aren’t keen on high heat.

Cheesy Bacon, Corn and Pepper Bread By LoveFoodies

3 eggs
1 T sugar
1/2 cup oil
1 cup Sweetcorn
1/4 Red Bell Pepper, cut small cubes
1/4 Green bell Pepper, cut small cubes
1 cup cooked and drained chopped bacon (cooled)
1 cup grated Cheddar cheese
8 Tablespoons of milk (divided)
1 1/2 cups All Purpose flour
1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp baking powder
1 T Salt (reduce if your bacon is salty)
1 T Black Pepper

Instructions:

  1. Add BaconPlace the sweetcorn in a blender or bowl, add 2 T of milk, then blend or mash. You can puree until smooth, or just pulse to have a lumpy texture. I pulsed to leave chunks of sweetcorn. Chop the peppers and set aside.
  2. In a mixer, add eggs, sugar, oil and mix for 5 minutes. Switch off mixer and using a wooden spoon, add the sweetcorn, bacon, red and green peppers and cheese. Combine well. Then add remaining 6 T of milk.
  3. In a separate bowl, mix together flour, baking soda and baking powder, salt & pepper then add that slowly to the wet mix and combine well.
  4. Pour the batter into the lined bread pan and bake at 325 F for 40 minutes. Test with a toothpick the center is cooked.

 

Sharing Experiences

Without experiments (sometimes accidental) we wouldn’t have some of the best combinations like chocolate and peanut butter, or the more recent addition of the doughnut burger. While some things should be eaten in moderation, we encourage you to try new things bringing fun and flare to your kitchen. What are your favorite flavors?  If you have a great combination please share it below, we love to learn more about what our customers like and what we can try in our own kitchens.

Kentucky Farm Bureau Ham Breakfast Review

BB ham

Every year, Kentucky Farm Bureau hosts a traditional Kentucky ham breakfast. The event takes place roughly one week after the Kentucky State Fair begins. “The Ham Breakfast celebrates agriculture and brings together urban and rural Kentuckians from every part of the state.” (KFB) This year, the tradition celebrated its 53rd anniversary, and had 1,600 attendees. The breakfast tradition began back in 1964, and to date has raised nearly $9.3 million dollars for organizations and charities across Kentucky.

Broadbent’s B & B Foods has won the Grand Champion Ham Blue Ribbon 17 times including our latest win this year. The wins have not all been consecutive but the bidding prices for these hams continue to raise hundreds of thousands of dollars for Kentucky charities. This year’s buyer was Central Bank, with a winning bid of $600,000 which they decided to split among 6 organizations and charities. Some may not realize but, it is actually the auction winner who decides which organizations the money bid is donated too.

Throughout our purple ribbon success (in this contest the blue ribbons are participation ribbons), we have set multiple records for the dollar amounts of the winning bids. Back in 2005, just a decade ago our ham broke a new record by bringing in $500,000 from First Southern Bank. Then that record was smashed by the $1,600,000 paid for the 2010 Grand Champion Ham. The record didn’t last long before in 2014, the Grand Champion Ham fetched a whopping $2 million dollars when purchased by Hermitage Farm, LLC and Republic Bank. That record has yet to be broken. Each year it is anyone’s guess as to what dollar amounts the bids will jump to during the Ham Breakfast auction, but we look forward to it each year.

Just for fun, let’s put a little perspective on this year’s winning bid. At $600,000 for a 17.38-pound ham, it comes out to right at $34,522 per pound. Online at broadbenthams.com you can purchase a similar ham cured in the same fashion and around the same size for merely $72.00. That means to get that same dollar amount we would need to sell 8,334 hams, and that’s not considering our initial cost for the hams. Sometimes it is overwhelming to think of how much money our ham’s fetch, but then again it is all for charity and that kind of money can bring some pretty amazing changes for those Kentuckians touched by this blessing.

Kentucky State Fair 2016

Beth & Ronny Drennan with Judge Tony Snow & The Grand Champion Ham

The Kentucky State Fair has been around since 1816, but Broadbent came onto the scene a bit later. It has been a tradition to enter a ham in the commercial Grand Champion Ham Competition for several years. Broadbent’s first entered in 1967 and also claimed their 1st Grand Champ Award. This year was our 17th win. It was the 10th win for Ronny and Beth since owning Broadbent B & B Foods. We feel it is a tremendous honor to be named Grand Champion. The Kentucky State Fair Country Ham Competition is second to none. Judge Tony Snow from Goodnight Brothers in North Carolina said “this competition was intense; judging was much harder than I had anticipated it would be”.

August 25th our winning ham will go up for sale at the Kentucky Farm Bureau Country Ham Breakfast. The winner of the ham will choose a charity to receive the money from the winning bid. Contrary to what some may think, we do not actually receive any profits from a winning ham. Instead we receive the accolade, bragging rights, and knowledge that we helped gain a large contribution to a charity that is usually based here in Kentucky.

This year we entered all five country ham classes. Four of the five hams we entered went on to place 1st in their class. The winner of classes 1-4 go on to compete for the Grand Champion and we had three hams in this phase of the competition with our Class 2 ham coming out victorious. Our Grand Champion Ham was put into cure before Jan. 1st, 2016 and weighed approximately 17 lbs. The fifth class is the cut class and we placed 1st in this class. The last class is the Group of Five. Scores for all 5 hams entered by a producer are totaled and the producer with the highest score will place 1st in this class. We continue to enter every year to maintain high level of quality as well as being a part of the Kentucky proud community.

Kentucky State Fair competitions aren’t just for companies or adults. Every year we work with children from local 4-H chapters and assist them with curing their own hams for the fair. This year we worked with 60 children who started curing 2 hams months in advance. Then, roughly a week before the fair they choose the best of their 2 hams then cleaned and shined the hams to be sent in to competition. There were several winners. We are fortunate to be able to give back to the local community in such a fun and rewarding manner.

Watch next week for more information on the Kentucky Farm Bureau Country Ham Charity Auction.

Broadbent Ham’s: The Entrepreneurial Journey of Beth & Ronny Drennan

Broadbent Ham’s- The Entrepreneurial Journey of Beth & Ronny Drennan


About 38 years ago, Beth and Ronny Drennan married and began an entrepreneurial journey with twists and turns guided by faith. Ronny had come from a farming background was no stranger to hard work and the entrepreneurial spirit. Ronny decided that farming was not his own personal career path to follow and decided to seek employment in other industries.

Ronny came across the opportunity to purchase a fuel service center, together they took the risk. Over a few years they grew it to include a bulk fuel supply, which supplied fuel for local farmers. The status quo of the town changed as less and less individuals farmed with encouragement from local government. The lack of farming dried business up for the bulk station, and soon the Drennan’s encountered a potential buyer and chose to sell the bulk supply half of the business. Soon the service station was sold as well. They found themselves looking to the next endeavor. Beth, who had worked alongside Ronnie at the stations found herself in need of amusement during the down time of a slow business. She turned to crafts, particularly Tole Painting (decorative painting on tin and wooden utensils). Ronnie assisted her by cutting shapes and building pine furniture, and they expanded their hobby to their next business.

Their primary distributor’s husband was a broker who sold businesses. He talked with Ronny during a routine drop off of goods and offered him the opportunity to perhaps purchase Broadbent Ham’s a mail order company. The Drennan’s continued to weigh the decision of purchasing Broadbent Ham’s throughout that year. Knowing it would be their largest undertaking yet, they again decided to have faith and dove in.

In 1999, the sale was final and the Drennan’s now owned the small company which employed 1 FT and 1 PT worker along with 12 seasonal workers. Today, they employee 20 individuals and operate a Deli & Gourmet Market that fronts their 20,000 sq ft production facility. They continue the traditional recipes and enter annually in the Kentucky State Fair. Their cured Kentucky Country hams continue to bring home blue ribbons and uphold family traditions.
We hope that you will continue to be part of a rich Kentucky tradition that dates back to 1909.

We welcome anyone to stop by our facility. We are happy to give tours and answer any questions. We are so grateful to be part of the rich heritage of Kentucky and hope to continue growing our business in the coming years.

5 Tips for Cooking with Kids

5 Tips for Cooking with Kids imagePlan Ahead

Children are not known for their patience so be sure to have every tool and ingredient at the ready. Create a clear space with all necessary equipment ready to use that the child(ren) can easily reach. Have the child wear the right attire, old clothes/play clothes or an apron.

Extras for Tasting/Touching

Children love to explore and it is a big part of their learning experience so include a few extras that they can touch and eat in the moment. This is of course ingredients that they can eat uncooked. But extra is usually good because things can be dropped on the floor, etc.

Practice Good Hygiene

This is a great time to teach about germs and basic hygiene. Remember to wash hands in the beginning, after handling each type of raw food, and when completed. Be sure to differentiate using different or cleaned utensils between raw and cooked foods.

Choose Recipes/Tasks at their level

Every child is unique in their interests and skill levels at different ages. Many children’s recipes and recipe books will have age guidelines but follow your own instincts as you know your child best. Choose a few tasks for them specifically, such as washing vegetables, mixing with a spoon, measuring, etc. based on their level. As the parent you can fill in the between or prep certain things before they enter. Children love to feel like they are helpful and have a purpose/responsibility and cooking allows them that in a controlled environment.

Have Fun

Cooking is often a fun activity but only if you allow it to be. As a parent have patience and don’t expect perfection. Relax and help guide them as they try to learn new skills if you are nervous or allow them to do very little they will lose out on making a good connection with cooking.

In my own family we usually had special nights that children cook, these were nights when time was not an issue. But I remember when I graduated from using a butter knife to cut some basic things, to a real slicing knife. It brought a sense of accomplishment and pride. Every child no matter the attitude, age (physical or mental) look for the same things in life to feel a part of some community. Family is our first community, so don’t think of cooking as chore but as a chance for your child to contribute.

Here are 2 recipes we love to create with kids in the kitchen.

Hot Ham Sandwiches Serves 4

4 Favorite rolls (croissants, homemade, etc.)
4 Thick Ham Slices (pre-cooked ham)
4 Cheese Slices (Cheddar, Swiss, Provolone or family favorite)
Onion Powder, to taste
Garlic Powder, to taste
Butter, to spread

Set out your rolls, ham, and cheese. Depending on the level you can use pre-sliced cheese or let them slice it with a knife or cheese slicer. Same with the ham, you can slice it to preferred size or let them cut it to the size they desire. You could also use cookie cutters to make fun shapes both from the ham and cheese, plus it skips using actual knives.

Turn over roll tops and add a simple coat of butter, then sprinkle with light garlic and onion powders. Stack sandwiches together and layer on a greased cookie sheet.

Bake in oven at 350 for about 15 minutes or until heated completely throughout.

*Feel free to add any other condiments your family love.

Eggs in a Hole with Bacon Serves 1

1 Slice Bread, any variety
1 Egg
Salt & Pepper to Taste
2 Slices Bacon
Grease skillet, and turn to low heat.

Cut a 1 ½ to 2 inch hole from the center, a small cookie cutter can be used also. Lay the bread into the skillet, and lightly toasted about 2 minutes. Then flip and crack egg directly into the created hole. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Continue to cook until the egg is cooked to firm, flip again and cook about 1 minutes more.

On a microwave safe plate, layer 3-4 paper towels. Place 2 slices of bacon across the plate and place in microwave for minutes. Cook longer 1 minute at a time until to desired crispiness level.
Serve immediately.

This is a great recipe for children who are just being introduced to using an actual stove top because the heat element remains on low, and the cooking time is short. If you are cooking for lots of people, you could let the children line the bacon on a cookie sheet and bake in oven rather than microwave to save time.

At Broadbent, we believe that meal time is family time and being a part of the preparation can let children feel like a more contributing member of their family. We encourage you to try a recipe in the kitchen with your children or grandchildren and introduce them to cooking. It is not only fun; it is a basic skill that every individual should know how to do in a basic sense.

3 International Pork Recipes to Inspire your Kitchen

international inspiration

Pork is a meat prevalent in many dishes around the world. The majority of countries incorporate Pork into their culture and cooking in a variety of ways. There are a few countries whose primary religion do not partake in the eating of pork and often other meats where the consumption is the lowest. The highest rate of pork consumption actually takes place in China.
To expand on your pork recipe repertoire, we wanted to share these 3 recipes that are delightful and don’t take a culinary degree to bring the taste to your table.

China

In China, a large movement begin in late 1970’s after the government liberalized agriculture. Now China’s pork consumption accounts for nearly half of the entire world. Pigs in general are avidly found throughout the Chinese culture including Zodiac signs, the character for family, and as part of many celebrations.
From trotter to tail, the Chinese consume the entire hog. Each part of the pig is used in various recipes to be sure that no part is wasted. Pigs are also often kept in Chinese homes because they create manure that fertilizes the family gardens. Some of the most well-known pork recipes are available here in the U.S. as well including Sweet & Sour Pork, Wontons, Dumplings, Chow Mein, and Spring Rolls. Below we have included my favorite recipe for Sweet & Sour Pork.
SWEET AND SOUR PORK (rasamalaysia.com)
INGREDIENTS:
1/2 lb. pork tenderloin (cut into bite size pieces)
1/2 green bell pepper (about 2 oz. and cut into pieces)
1/2 red bell pepper (about 2 oz. and cut into pieces)
2 stalks scallions (only the white part, cut into 2 inch length)
1 piece fresh/canned pineapple ring (cut into small pieces)
1 clove garlic (finely chopped)
Oil for frying
MARINATE:
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon corn starch
1/2 teaspoon rice wine
FRYING BATTER:
1/2 cup water
2 oz. all-purpose flour
1 oz. corn starch
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 egg
1 teaspoon cooking oil
1 small pinch of salt
SWEET AND SOUR SAUCE:
1 1/2 tablespoons tomato ketchup
1 teaspoon plum sauce
1/8 teaspoon Chinese rice vinegar (transparent in color)
1/2 teaspoon Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce
1 teaspoon oyster sauce
1 teaspoon corn starch
1 teaspoon sugar
2 tablespoons water
INSTRUCTIONS:
Cut the pork tenderloin into pieces and marinate with the ingredients for 15-20 minutes.
Mix the sweet and sour sauce ingredients well and set aside.
Strain the dry ingredients of the frying batter and then add in the egg, water, and cooking oil to form a thick batter.
When the pork is well-marinated, transfer the pork pieces into the batter and make sure they are well coated. In a deep skillet, add in the cooking oil enough for deep-frying. Once the oil is hot, deep fry the pork pieces until they turn golden brown. Dish out and drain on paper towels.
Heat up a wok and add in some cooking oil. Add in the chopped garlic and stir fry until light brown, then follow by the bell peppers and pineapple pieces. Stir fry until you smell the peppery aroma from the peppers and then add in the sweet and sour sauce. As soon as the sauce thickens, transfer the pork into the wok and stir well with the sauce. Add in the chopped scallions, do a few quick stirs, dish out and serve hot with steamed white rice.

United Kingdom

In the United Kingdom pork is a popular meat used in a large variety of dishes. Similar to America they often roast, fry, and barbecue their pork. Unlike most Americans they also utilize the pork belly frequently, the head for recipes such as Braised Pig’s Head and Pig’s Head Terrine. This usage of each part of the pig is often found in fine dining establishments, as well as in the rural homes that often come to mind. One common style of pork not often utilized in American cooking is minced meat. This easy recipe from Chef Jamie Oliver’s collection includes traditional minced pork.
Pork & Apple Sausage Rolls (Jamie Oliver Recipe)
INGREDIENTS
  • 1 leek
  • 1 Royal Gala apple
  • 4 sprigs of fresh thyme
  • 500 g minced pork
  • ½ teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 500 g puff pastry
  • 1 large free-range eggs
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Preheat the oven to 200ºC/gas 6.
  2. Wash, trim and dice the leek, core and dice the apple, then pick the thyme leaves.
  3. Combine the pork, leek, apple, thyme leaves and mustard seeds in a bowl. Season and set aside.
  4. Roll out the pastry to 1cm thick and 30 x 34cm. Halve lengthways and place a strip of mince down the center of each.
  5. Brush the edges with beaten egg, roll up and seal. Brush with more egg, then cut each strip into 3 rolls.
  6. Score the tops and bake for 20 minutes, or until golden and cooked through.

Australia

In Australia, the country is leading the way in pig care. The industry began to phase out sow stall back in 2010 and continues to strive towards breeding contented and healthy pigs. Farmers often recognize the pig as a vital part of their lifestyle. Pig producers use manure and effluent on their farms as fertilizer to improve their pasture and crops, some go a step further and capture the methane gases which are then converted to fuel. Australia’s pig herd health is one of the best in the world, their farms are free of many of the diseases that plague others around the world.
Many recipes traditional to Australia are lighter than some of the heavy American familiar dishes but are quite similar overall. They also utilize many similar styles to the United Kingdom, stemming from their immigration roots just as America employs its cooking styles from a wide variety on influencing countries.
Australian Ham Burger (pork.com/au)
INGREDIENTS
4 Briosche buns
4 Thick Sliced of Australian Leg Ham
4 Slices medium hard cheese (Jarlsberg is traditional)
4 Large Dill pickles, sandwich sliced
½ C Mayonnaise
2 T. Mustard Seed
2 tsp. Olive Oil
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Heat a griddle pan over medium heat and grill the brioche rolls until golden and warmed through. Remove and set aside.
  2. Use the oil to grill the sliced ham on the griddle for 2 minutes on each side. Turn off the heat and stack the ham into 4 portions and top with Swiss cheese.
  3. Spread the base of each roll with seeded mustard and the top of each roll with a good dollop of mayonnaise.
  4. Transfer the grilled ham and cheese onto the base of each roll, top the cheese with a sliced dill pickle.
  5. Replace the top of the bun and serve immediately
I especially love the Australian Ham Burger, it is delicious and a lighter alternative for the traditional beef burger that is a summer staple. Each culture places different values and usefulness on various animals. Pigs are very popular and valued in so many cultures, even those where it may not be a staple on the dinner table but is within the community. I encourage you to click the links and take a look around at these and other recipes to inspire your taste buds.
When it comes to cooking, it’s a great area to take risks and go outside your comfort zone. Do you have any favorite recipes for pork? We are fans of family traditions here at Broadbent, please share your family favorites.

3 International Pork Inspiration

Pork is a meat prevalent in many dishes around the world. The majority of countries incorporate Pork into their culture and cooking in a variety of ways. There are a few countries whose primary religion do not partake in the eating of pork and often other meats where the consumption is the lowest. The highest rate of pork consumption actually takes place in China.

To expand on your pork recipe repertoire, we wanted to share these 3 recipes that are delightful and don’t take a culinary degree to bring the taste to your table.

China

In China, a large movement begin in late 1970’s after the government liberalized agriculture. Now China’s pork consumption accounts for nearly half of the entire world. Pigs in general are avidly found throughout the Chinese culture including Zodiac signs, the character for family, and as part of many celebrations.
From trotter to tail, the Chinese consume the entire hog. Each part of the pig is used in various recipes to be sure that no part is wasted. Pigs are also often kept in Chinese homes because they create manure that fertilizes the family gardens. Some of the most well-known pork recipes are available here in the U.S. as well including Sweet & Sour Pork, Wontons, Dumplings, Chow Mein, and Spring Rolls. Below we have included my favorite recipe for Sweet & Sour Pork.

SWEET AND SOUR PORK (rasamalaysia.com)

INGREDIENTS:
1/2 lb. pork tenderloin (cut into bite size pieces)
1/2 green bell pepper (about 2 oz. and cut into pieces)
1/2 red bell pepper (about 2 oz. and cut into pieces)
2 stalks scallions (only the white part, cut into 2 inch length)
1 piece fresh/canned pineapple ring (cut into small pieces)
1 clove garlic (finely chopped)
Oil for frying

MARINATE:
1 teaspoon soy sauce
1/2 teaspoon corn starch
1/2 teaspoon rice wine

FRYING BATTER:
1/2 cup water
2 oz. all-purpose flour
1 oz. corn starch
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 egg
1 teaspoon cooking oil
1 small pinch of salt

SWEET AND SOUR SAUCE:
1 1/2 tablespoons tomato ketchup
1 teaspoon plum sauce
1/8 teaspoon Chinese rice vinegar (transparent in color)
1/2 teaspoon Lea & Perrins Worcestershire Sauce
1 teaspoon oyster sauce
1 teaspoon corn starch
1 teaspoon sugar
2 tablespoons water

INSTRUCTIONS:
Cut the pork tenderloin into pieces and marinate with the ingredients for 15-20 minutes.
Mix the sweet and sour sauce ingredients well and set aside.
Strain the dry ingredients of the frying batter and then add in the egg, water, and cooking oil to form a thick batter.
When the pork is well-marinated, transfer the pork pieces into the batter and make sure they are well coated. In a deep skillet, add in the cooking oil enough for deep-frying. Once the oil is hot, deep fry the pork pieces until they turn golden brown. Dish out and drain on paper towels.
Heat up a wok and add in some cooking oil. Add in the chopped garlic and stir fry until light brown, then follow by the bell peppers and pineapple pieces. Stir fry until you smell the peppery aroma from the peppers and then add in the sweet and sour sauce. As soon as the sauce thickens, transfer the pork into the wok and stir well with the sauce. Add in the chopped scallions, do a few quick stirs, dish out and serve hot with steamed white rice.

United Kingdom

In the United Kingdom pork is a popular meat used in a large variety of dishes. Similar to America they often roast, fry, and barbecue their pork. Unlike most Americans they also utilize the pork belly frequently, the head for recipes such as Braised Pig’s Head and Pig’s Head Terrine. This usage of each part of the pig is often found in fine dining establishments, as well as in the rural homes that often come to mind. One common style of pork not often utilized in American cooking is minced meat. This easy recipe from Chef Jamie Oliver’s collection includes traditional minced pork.

Pork & Apple Sausage Rolls (Jamie Oliver Recipe)

INGREDIENTS
  • 1 leek
  • 1 Royal Gala apple
  • 4 sprigs of fresh thyme
  • 500 g minced pork
  • ½ teaspoon mustard seeds
  • 500 g puff pastry
  • 1 large free-range eggs
INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Preheat the oven to 200ºC/gas 6.
  2. Wash, trim and dice the leek, core and dice the apple, then pick the thyme leaves.
  3. Combine the pork, leek, apple, thyme leaves and mustard seeds in a bowl. Season and set aside.
  4. Roll out the pastry to 1cm thick and 30 x 34cm. Halve lengthways and place a strip of mince down the center of each.
  5. Brush the edges with beaten egg, roll up and seal. Brush with more egg, then cut each strip into 3 rolls.
  6. Score the tops and bake for 20 minutes, or until golden and cooked through.

Australia

In Australia, the country is leading the way in pig care. The industry began to phase out sow stall back in 2010 and continues to strive towards breeding contented and healthy pigs. Farmers often recognize the pig as a vital part of their lifestyle. Pig producers use manure and effluent on their farms as fertilizer to improve their pasture and crops, some go a step further and capture the methane gases which are then converted to fuel. Australia’s pig herd health is one of the best in the world, their farms are free of many of the diseases that plague others around the world.

Many recipes traditional to Australia are lighter than some of the heavy American familiar dishes but are quite similar overall. They also utilize many similar styles to the United Kingdom, stemming from their immigration roots just as America employs its cooking styles from a wide variety on influencing countries.

Australian Ham Burger (pork.com/au)

INGREDIENTS
4 Briosche buns
4 Thick Sliced of Australian Leg Ham
4 Slices medium hard cheese (Jarlsberg is traditional)
4 Large Dill pickles, sandwich sliced
½ C Mayonnaise
2 T. Mustard Seed
2 tsp. Olive Oil

INSTRUCTIONS
  1. Heat a griddle pan over medium heat and grill the brioche rolls until golden and warmed through. Remove and set aside.
  2. Use the oil to grill the sliced ham on the griddle for 2 minutes on each side. Turn off the heat and stack the ham into 4 portions and top with Swiss cheese.
  3. Spread the base of each roll with seeded mustard and the top of each roll with a good dollop of mayonnaise.
  4. Transfer the grilled ham and cheese onto the base of each roll, top the cheese with a sliced dill pickle.
  5. Replace the top of the bun and serve immediately
I especially love the Australian Ham Burger, it is delicious and a lighter alternative for the traditional beef burger that is a summer staple. Each culture places different values and usefulness on various animals. Pigs are very popular and valued in so many cultures, even those where it may not be a staple on the dinner table but is within the community. I encourage you to click the links and take a look around at these and other recipes to inspire your taste buds.

When it comes to cooking, it’s a great area to take risks and go outside your comfort zone. Do you have any favorite recipes for pork? We are fans of family traditions here at Broadbent, please share your family favorites.

5 Bacon Desserts You can DIY

5 Bacon Dessert You Can DIY

When it comes to bacon it is a natural fit for breakfast and pairs wonderfully with so many dishes at lunch and dinner. Now let’s talk dessert. Bacon makes almost everything better (like 99% of things). We are getting serious about the sweet and salty side of dessert with these 5 bacon centered dessert recipes.

#1 Chocolate Covered Pretzels with Bacon Sprinkles
Depending on the exact number of pretzels you can cook a few stripes of bacon in the microwave for a small batch or for a large I suggest cooking a full package in the oven.
Ingredients:
1 bag Pretzel Rods
12 oz. semi- sweet chocolate (chips, chunk, etc) Chocolate
1 lb. your favorite flavor of Broadbent’s bacon
Instructions:
Once the bacon is cooked crumble it and set in a shallow dish next to the chocolate. Melt your chocolate in double boiler or microwave whichever you prefer. Dip pretzel rods into chocolate roughly ¾ of the way up, then roll along the shallow dish filled with bacon crumbles. (if you want a light coating try sprinkling it on instead). Place on a lined cookie sheet with parchment paper and place in refrigerator for 15-20 minutes to allow it to fully harden. Then display in a large clear vase or jar and serve with chocolate side down.

#2 Chocolate Covered Bacon Bites
This is the recipe where Broadbent’s thick cut bacon really shines. It is hearty enough to cook and support the additional chocolate coating.
Ingredients
1 pkg Broadbent’s Thick Cut Maple or Hickory Bacon
1 C. Semi-sweet chocolate (chips, chunk, etc.)
Optional Coatings: chopped nuts, sea salt, brown sugar, cayenne pepper, coconut, sprinkles, white chocolate drizzle

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